Friends Of Local Koalas

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What to do to assist a sick or

Injured Koala if you find one

 

 

Shown here is an adult male koala with broken arm & internal injuries caused by a careless car driver. He died within 24 hours of being hit.

Below is a young male koala (about 18 months old) with broken pelvis & internal injuries. He was hit by a truck. His injuries were too severe, he was hemorrhaging, then went into shock & within 24 hours had to be put down.

 

 

First of all:

 

You need to know that is illegal to keep native animals (alive or dead) without specific permit.

If you find a Koala which is sick or injured , protect them from further injury but do not pick them up.

 

HOW TO TELL IF THE KOALA IS SICK:
 

OBSERVE & ASSESS:

  • If it is sitting on the ground for a length of time, this could be a cause for concern. Observe from distance.
  • If it has been in the same tree, or area, for 3-4 days - it is probably sick.
  • Look for unusual behaviour, movements or posture. Don’t worry about the noise they make, especially if fighting - this is normal.

 

IF YOU FIND A KOALA ON THE ROAD, OR HIT ONE WITH YOUR CAR:

  • Don’t just leave it there.
  • Stop. Do not touch the koala unless it is dead , in which case move it to the side of the road. If injured protect from further damage and please notify someone.
  • In addition - if the koala is dead, check it’s pouch, if female - it may have a live cub in it.
  • Take care and be gentle.

Seek professional help.
It takes a great deal of expertise to care for injured or sick koala’s.

Contact Jennie Bryant-- 0417 395 883--- Voluntary carer for koala’s in the Westernport region

Or

Contact Wildlife Victoria: 13 000 94535

Or

Contact a local veterinary clinic

 

Other things you can do to help Koalas

  • Drive slowly, especially at night. Look out for them.

  • Ensure that your dog is locked up at night, or restrained during the day and not roaming. Your dog may not attack koalas on it’s own (or while you are around), but is likely to do it when it teams up with another dog. Koalas often die in agony as a result of dog attacks.

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